Our Bible Hour is on Sundays at 10am at Castle Hill Community Centre, Highfield Road, Ipswich, IP1 6DG.

Our programme for October to December, God willing:

 

7 October        Big Bible themes – repentance and baptism

 

14 October      Let’s talk about prophecies - Zechariah

 

21 October      The young church in action – persecution and dispersion (Acts 8)

28 October      The young church in action – the road to Damascus (Acts 9)

 

4 November    Big Bible themes – the Kingdom of God on earth

 

11 November  The young church in action – the conversion of                    Cornelius (Acts 10)

 

18 November  Prayer – principles and practice

 

25 November  A living faith for a dying world

 

2 December    Big Bible themes – watching and waiting for the return of Jesus

 

9 December    Let’s talk about prophecies - Revelation

 

16 December  Sayings of Jesus – ‘I am the good shepherd’

 

23 December  Sayings of Jesus – ‘I am the true vine’

 

30 December Sayings of Jesus – ‘I am the way, the truth and the life’

 

ANGLIA GOOD NEWS!         from the Ipswich Christadelphians

October 2018

 

All is safely gathered in…

 

Traditionally, this is the time of year to celebrate harvest. With fewer people living in rural areas, it’s easy to overlook the importance of the abundant harvests yielded by our own fields and orchards.

Perhaps, though, living in a largely rural county, we in Suffolk might have a greater appreciation of the natural processes of food production. This summer the combines have marched across the fields of golden wheat and barley cutting the precious grain, and the rape has yielded its tiny black seed.

Now harvest is well under way in the orchards and this winter it will be the turn of the sugar beet.  Then there’s the year-round dairy, beef, pork and lamb production. So we are reminded of the richness of our native earth and temperate climate, and it is right that we should pause and be thankful to the Creator for his provision.

combineAs with every year, the farmers have their worries – the long hot summer which we (mostly) enjoyed, has reduced yields and there is talk of shortages and price rises. We need to reflect on the challenges to those who produce our food – declining populations of pollinating bees, changing climate, receding forests, world population increase and migration. Our daily bread depends on an increasingly delicate ecosystem.

bread





Our daily bread

But there is a real and tangible hope for us in the Bible. As part of the prayer Jesus gave his disciples (Matthew 6:9-11) – we find this: ‘Our Father in Heaven… give us this day our daily bread.’ Ultimately it is the Creator himself who gives us our food, ensures the harvest and blesses the yields. Just as we can become isolated from the realities of food production on our farms, it’s all too easy to lose sight of the divine source of life and health.

A joyous feast

pic3Harvest is an important theme in the Bible. After the Genesis flood, (Genesis 8:22) God made a promise to Noah, and to us that ‘While the earth remains, seedtime and harvest, cold and heat, summer and winter, day and night, shall not cease.’ When the Children of Israel, God’s chosen people, were given the Law as they journeyed through the wilderness of Sinai, feasts and celebrations were established throughout the year. One of the most joyful of these was the feast of harvests: ‘You shall keep the Feast of Harvest, of the first-fruits of your labour, of what you sow in the field. You shall keep the Feast of Ingathering at the end of the year, when you gather in from the field the fruit of your labour’ (Exodus 23:16).

Remember those in need

There was provision in the Law of Moses that harvesters should not go back and cut the bits they had missed, the corners of the fields, but leave them to the poor to glean: ‘When you reap the harvest of your land, you shall not reap your field right up to its edge, neither shall you gather the gleanings after your harvest(Leviticus 19:9) In the Old Testament account of Ruth the commandment to remember those in need played an essential part.001-ruth-2

sowerThe sower and the seed

In the parable of the sower (Matthew 13:1-23) Jesus refers to his teaching about the Kingdom of God as being like a harvest. Some seed falls on unfertile ground and yields a poor crop, some on good ground, yielding an abundant crop. The good ground represents men and women who hear the message of the Word of God, the teaching of Jesus, and respond to it, and are like grain gathered into the barn at the time of harvest. The harvest is God’s promised Kingdom on earth which Jesus will establish on the earth when he returns. Let us pray that he will soon return to fill the earth with God’s glory!

 

 

We invite you to our BIBLE HOUR at 10am on Sunday, 23 September, God willing, when the theme will be HARVESTWe support Families in Need (FIND), a local Christian charity which offers a lifeline to people in Ipswich and the surrounding areas experiencing poverty and despair. If you would like to contribute to the work of FIND, you may wish to bring along in-date tins and packets of dry food (no fresh perishables please), all of which will be passed directly to FIND.

All is safely gathered in…

 

Traditionally, this is the time of year to celebrate harvest. With fewer people living in rural areas, it’s easy to overlook the importance of the abundant harvests yielded by our own fields and orchards.

Perhaps, though, living in a largely rural county, we in Suffolk might have a greater appreciation of the natural processes of food production. This summer the combines have marched across the fields of golden wheat and barley cutting the precious grain, and the rape has yielded its tiny black seed.

Now harvest is well under way in the orchards and this winter it will be the turn of the sugar beet.  Then there’s the year-round